How to Find a Court of Protection Hearing to Observe

By Celia Kitzinger, 17th August 2020 There are various ways for you to find a hearing to observe, if you are interested in seeing law in action in the Court of Protection. Obviously, you can simply pick one of our “Featured Hearings” from the home page of our website: we update them every evening forContinue reading “How to Find a Court of Protection Hearing to Observe”

Accessing Open Justice: Our Experience

“…Overall, we encourage anyone with an interest in open justice (which should be everyone), including students, or aspiring lawyers, to utilise this great project and raise awareness of just how open, open justice can be…”

Should P’s ‘Litigation Friend’ instruct P’s lawyer to promote P’s wishes and leave ‘Best Interests’ decision-making to the judge?

“…Do we need to change the system? Should P’s ‘Litigation Friend’ instruct P’s lawyer to promote P’s views – and leave ‘Best Interests’ decision-making to the judge?”

Addressing the Oral Judgment to the Person it Most Concerns

By Celia Kitzinger – 3rd August, 2020 Something exceptional happened in a hearing I observed last week.  A judge – it was Mr Justice Cobb – delivered an oral judgment directly to the young woman at the centre of the case, addressing her by name. This was the 53rd hearing I have observed in theContinue reading “Addressing the Oral Judgment to the Person it Most Concerns”

Navigating Approaches to Care when Family and Local Authority Disagree

By Hilary Paxton – 31st July, 2020 On 29 June I started a job as a 2-day per week trainee Independent Mental Capacity Advocate (IMCA) and Relevant Person’s Representative (RPR) for an advocacy provider in Yorkshire. I am currently doing my induction and lots of training.  I have never worked with the Court of ProtectionContinue reading “Navigating Approaches to Care when Family and Local Authority Disagree”

Over-ruling P’s Strong Wishes in a Best Interests Decision: Autonomy, Protection and P’s voice

“…The position taken by the Official Solicitor (OS) meant that the Local Authority (the applicant), the NHS Trust (the second respondent) and the OS (the first respondent) all took exactly the same position – all opposed to P’s wishes. It felt very one-sided and as though nobody was arguing for what P wanted, except for P herself…”