A section 21A hearing: Impressions from a veteran observer and the daughter of (a different) P in a s.21A case

By Celia Kitzinger and Anna (Daughter of P), 9th May 2022 Anna (not her real name) contacted the Open Justice Court of Protection Project towards the end of April 2022, saying that she’d been asked to attend a s. 21A directions hearing about her mother (in a care home, with Alzheimer’s) and was finding the Court ofContinue reading “A section 21A hearing: Impressions from a veteran observer and the daughter of (a different) P in a s.21A case”

Communicating bad news: A s.21A decision

By Celia Kitzinger, 1 March 2022 Ms C says she hates where she lives – in a residential care home (I’ll call it“Beech House”). She has said so “loudly”. She expressed her “strongly held feelings” directly to the judge when he met with her on 25th January 2022.  Throughout that meeting she maintained, in strong terms, thatContinue reading “Communicating bad news: A s.21A decision”

Delay in finding a suitable placement for a young adult with Prader-Willi syndrome

By Aura Mackintosh Bamber, 22 February 2022 For any child’s family, a diagnosis of Prader-Willi Syndrome brings with it a number of responsibilities and worries that are involved in properly caring for and managing this complex disorder.  These worries are only exacerbated when a decision is made to deprive that child of their liberty inContinue reading “Delay in finding a suitable placement for a young adult with Prader-Willi syndrome”

Prader-Willi Syndrome and Transparency

A young man with Prader-Willi Syndrome was at the centre of a hearing before Theis J. I can only tell you this because journalist Brian Farmer and I made submissions to the judge saying that we should be allowed to report it and she eventually agreed.

Untenable and unsafe: A trial of living in the community breaks down

So, Mr G will return to the safety of residential care, where he will no doubt continue to rage against his incarceration, but there will be a suitable infrastructure to help him manage his precarious health condition. The question one is left with, of course, is, as Munby J famously said: “What good is making someone safer if it merely makes them miserable?”

How long can you keep trying to rebut the presumption of capacity?

By Celia Kitzinger, 3rd December 2021 It’s a fundamental principle of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 that “A person must be assumed to have capacity unless it is established that he lacks capacity” (1(2)) Likewise, “A person is not to be treated as unable to make a decision merely because he makes an unwise decision” (1(4)). TheContinue reading “How long can you keep trying to rebut the presumption of capacity?”

Fact-finding, ‘magnetic importance’, and the consternation of colleagues: A final hearing adjourned

At the heart of this hearing is the question of whether P can live with her mother, who loves her and wants to care for her. Attempts to elicit P’s wishes and feelings have been unsuccessful, but the social worker has said that “having observed the loving and affectionate relationship that [P] has with her family and that she has been cared for by them throughout her life, it is understood that [P] would wish to continue to stay with her family and be cared for by them”.

A trial of living at home – a “suspended sentence” of returning to care

By Jenny Kitzinger, 20th October 2021 Mr G desperately wants to live in his own flat – but this option is hanging by a thread.   After a series of court hearings at which he challenged his “detention” in residential care (via s.21A of the Mental Capacity Act 2015), he finally moved back into his ownContinue reading “A trial of living at home – a “suspended sentence” of returning to care”

“You can’t ask the High Court to turn a blind eye to illegal detention”

“You have to do better than that.  You can’t ask the High Court to turn a blind eye to illegal detention. If this was an immigration case, I would be letting him out now. You can’t unlawfully detain people in the UK. You’ve got four days to sort this out. If the situation is that  he should just go home – then just do it. I’m not going to order you to do it because I haven’t got the evidence.” (Mrs Justice Lieven)

Hillingdon 10 Years on: Another Deprivation of Liberty

EW’s wish to end her days in Inverness may not weigh heavily in the best interests decision that will need to be made if the court decides that she lacks capacity to make her own decision about where to live.  I worry that the groundwork for that  is already being prepared. There was a weariness whenever Scotland was mentioned.